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For Alzheimer's and Dementia

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When a Loved One with Alzheimer’s Doesn’t Recognize You

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 In early-stage dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, intermittent symptoms of mild cognitive decline—such as word searching, forgetfulness, and trouble concentrating and problem-solving—are visible. As the disease advances, lapses in people’s memories become even more apparent. Such lapses can cause an inability to remember—or recognize—family members. As a result, some family relationships diminish, leaving the person with…

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Music and Memory

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 We all need to feel engaged and entertained to stay active both physically and mentally. Just because someone has Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia doesn’t mean that need disappears. People in nursing homes and other care organizations can find renewed meaning and connection in their lives through the gift of music.  Studies have…

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Expressing Gratitude

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“Gratitude is good medicine, “ says Robert Emmons, Ph.D., author of The Little Book of Gratitude. “Clinical trials indicate that the practice of gratitude can have dramatic and lasting positive effects in a person’s life. It can lower blood pressure and improve immune function. Grateful people en-gage in more exercise, have better dietary behaviors and…

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Strategies for Connecting

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Have you ever noticed that the abilities of a person living with dementia can change greatly over short periods of time? It can be extremely challenging to know what exactly to expect on a day-to-day basis. First, slowing down your initial approach can be very helpful.  Greet them from a small distance away. Watch their…

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Strategies For Dealing With Caregiver Stress

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The emotional and physical demands involved with caregiving can strain even the most resilient person. That’s why it’s so important to take advantage of the many resources and tools available to help you provide care for your loved one. Remember, if you don’t take care of yourself, you won’t be able to care for anyone…

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Validation Therapy and Dementia Care

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Validation is a good feeling. Most of us try to surround ourselves with people who, through their words and actions, make us feel understood and supported. The need to feel validated doesn’t disappear when someone develops Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia, but it can be hard for loves ones and caregivers to provide…

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7 Ways of Helping a Person with Dementia Symptoms Feel Less Anxious

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This article was originally posted on TeepaSnow.com, written by Valerie Feurich.  Read the original article here >   As you go through life, you may tend to take for granted the amazing feats and abilities of your brain. Remembering where you parked the car, how to make your favorite pasta dish, or being able to…

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New Years Resolutions to Reduce The Risk of Cognitive Decline

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What if our resolutions could improve brain health and reduce the risk of cognitive decline? Wouldn’t we all want to accept the challenge? 1. Exercise your brain— As the saying goes, “Use it or lose it!” Keeping your brain stimulated can improve cognitive skills and reduce or risk of dementia. 2. Keep moving— Physical activity…

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Asking people with memory loss about past holidays can help them recall happy times

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Using a process called reminiscence therapy, that may be possible. In reminiscence therapy, people are encouraged to dis- cuss memories of positive experiences. Most center on asking questions that may help prompt holiday-themed memories. The following are examples of what we at Primrose will ask our residents: What were your family traditions around the holidays…

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Tips for meeting nutritional needs for those living with memory loss

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Eating a healthy and balanced diet can be a challenge for anyone, but for people living with dementia and Alzheimer’s, it often falls on caregivers to ensure meals are adequately prepared, served, and eaten. Outside of making sure appropriate nutrient and caloric needs are being met, caregivers for those with cognitive illnesses may also have…

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